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Self-taught artist Odinga Tyehimba. His current project, Rebel Shrine, consists of various ritual power-figures which work in unison to form a visual commentary in contrast to the impact of cultural imperialism that stems from the Euro-centric worldview. Odinga’s objective has been to inspire healing and self-realization through his work. Rebel Shrine has been chosen to be part of an upcoming show at The Gregg Museum of Art & Design at North Carolina State University. Glenn Hinson, Associate Professor of Folklore and Anthropology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has watched Odinga’s work evolve for many years. He wrote “Few artists create work that can truly be called “monumental. Not merely in terms of size, but in terms of power, of its ability to challenge, to shake, to transform. Tyehimba is one such artist. For more than a decade, Odinga Tyehimba has been working on a single monumental piece, a multi-figured altar whose layered complexity speaks to cultural history, spiritual emergence, and personal growth. Each component of this masterwork tells a textured story, inviting viewers to confront the historical and spiritual realities of the African American experience.

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Filename
20120220_170_Odinga_BW_DLA.JPG
Copyright
DL Anderson © 2012
Image Size
2885x2142 / 1.8MB
Contained in galleries
Self-taught artist Odinga Tyehimba. His current project, Rebel Shrine, consists of various ritual power-figures which work in unison to form a visual commentary in contrast to the impact of cultural imperialism that stems from the Euro-centric worldview. Odinga’s objective has been to inspire healing and self-realization through his work. Rebel Shrine has been chosen to be part of an upcoming show at The Gregg Museum of Art & Design at North Carolina State University. Glenn Hinson, Associate Professor of Folklore and Anthropology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has watched Odinga’s work evolve for many years. He wrote “Few artists create work that can truly be called “monumental. Not merely in terms of size, but in terms of power, of its ability to challenge, to shake, to transform. Tyehimba is one such artist. For more than a decade, Odinga Tyehimba has been working on a single monumental piece, a multi-figured altar whose layered complexity speaks to cultural history, spiritual emergence, and personal growth. Each component of this masterwork tells a textured story, inviting viewers to confront the historical and spiritual realities of the African American experience.